Mysterious Encounters / Texas Thicket Monster / Bigfoot

Mysterious Encounters: Texas Thicket Monster
Bigfoot sightings in Texas.

Bigfoot (also known as Sasquatch) is the name given to a mythological simian, ape-, or hominid-like creature that is said to inhabit forests, mainly in the Pacific Northwest. In North American folklore, Bigfoot is usually described as a large, hairy, bipedal humanoid. The term sasquatch is an Anglicized derivative of the Halkomelem word sásq’ets.
Scientists discount the existence of Bigfoot and consider it to be a combination of folklore, misidentification, and hoax, rather than a living animal, because of the lack of physical evidence and the large numbers of creatures that would be necessary to maintain a breeding population. Occasional new reports of sightings sustain a small group of self-described investigators. Most reports of sightings are attributed to being various animals, particularly black bears.

Bigfoot is described as a large, hairy, muscular, bipedal ape-like creature, roughly 2–3 metres (6 ft 7 in–9 ft 10 in) covered in hair described as black, dark brown, or dark reddish.

Individuals claiming to have seen Bigfoot described large eyes, a pronounced brow ridge, and a large, low-set forehead; the top of the head has been described as rounded and crested, similar to the sagittal crest of the male gorilla, with a strong, unpleasant smell.The enormous footprints for which it is named are claimed to be as large as 24 inches (60 cm) long and 8 inches (20 cm) wide.Some footprint casts have also contained claw marks, making it likely that they came from known animals, such as bears, which have five toes and claws.Proponents claim that Bigfoot is omnivorous and mainly nocturnal.
About one-third of all claims of Bigfoot sightings are located in the Pacific Northwest, with the remaining reports spread throughout the rest of North America.Most reports are considered mistakes or hoaxes, even by researchers who maintain that Bigfoot exists.

As Bigfoot has become better known and a phenomenon in popular culture, sightings have spread throughout North America. In addition to the Pacific Northwest, the Great Lakes region and the Southeastern United States have had many reports of Bigfoot sightings. The debate over the legitimacy of Bigfoot sightings reached a peak in the 1970s, and Bigfoot has been regarded as the first widely popularized example of pseudoscience in American culture.
Bigfoot has had a demonstrable impact as a popular culture phenomenon. It has “become entrenched in American popular culture and it is as viable an icon as Michael Jordan” with more than forty-five years having passed since reported sightings in California, and neither an animal nor “a satisfying explanation as to why folks see giant hairy men that don’t exist”.

When asked for her opinion of Bigfoot in a September 27, 2002, interview on National Public Radio’s “Science Friday”, Jane Goodall said “I’m sure they exist”, and later said, chuckling, “Well, I’m a romantic, so I always wanted them to exist”, and finally, “You know, why isn’t there a body? I can’t answer that, and maybe they don’t exist, but I want them to.”In 2012, when asked again by the Huffington Post, Goodall said “I’m fascinated and would actually love them to exist,” adding, “Of course, it’s strange that there has never been a single authentic hide or hair of the Bigfoot, but I’ve read all the account
After what The Huffington Post described as “a five-year study of purported Bigfoot (also known as Sasquatch) DNA samples,”Texas veterinarian Melba Ketchum and her team announced that they had found proof that the Sasquatch “is a human relative that arose approximately 15,000 years ago as a hybrid cross of modern Homo sapiens with an unknown primate species”. Ketchum called for this to be recognized officially, saying that “Government at all levels must recognize them as an indigenous people and immediately protect their human and Constitutional rights against those who would see in their physical and cultural differences a ‘license’ to hunt, trap, or kill them.”Failing to find a scientific journal that would publish their results, Ketchum announced on February 13, 2013 that their research had been published in the DeNovo Journal of Science. The Huffington Post discovered that the journal’s domain had been registered anonymously only nine days before the announcement. The only edition of DeNovo was listed as Volume 1, Issue 1, and its only content was the Bigfoot research.